Thought and Emotion: Developmental Perspectives

Thought and Emotion: Developmental Perspectives

Thought and Emotion: Developmental Perspectives

Thought and Emotion: Developmental Perspectives

Excerpt

Two types of theories guide most of the research on the study of relationships between emotion and cognition. I shall refer to the first class as cognitive theory because these theories conceive of cognition as the primary mental process and as the cause of emotion. The other type shall be referred to as dynamic theory because theories of this type view emotion as the primary mental process and as the primary cause or motivation for cognition. Although these synoptic descriptions suggest that these positions are in total disagreement on all issues, they are not. I suggest some of the important ways in which they do differ.

In recent years a number of investigators have made distinct contributions to cognitive theory of emotional development. In this brief review I omit some major contributions to general cognitive theory of emotion because they have not addressed developmental issues.

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AS A FUNCTION OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Emotion is seen by Mandier (1982), and by Kagan (1984) as a function of cognition. Mandler has not written much about emotional development, but he is in agreement with Piaget on the issue of the inseparability of affect and cognition. He sees emotion as a cognitive construction, its intensity determined by perceived level of autonomic arousal and its quality by evaluative processes.

Thus, for Mandler, the study of emotional development is the study of two . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.