After the Cold War: Domestic Factors and U.S.-China Relations

After the Cold War: Domestic Factors and U.S.-China Relations

After the Cold War: Domestic Factors and U.S.-China Relations

After the Cold War: Domestic Factors and U.S.-China Relations

Synopsis

As relations between the United States and China move into a period of intense activity and sensitivity, this timely book addresses the impact of domestic factors in both countries on their post-Cold War/post-Tiananmen relations. The contributors examine the issue from a number of distinct perspectives: the increased impact of domestic factors in both countries due to changing strategic circumstances; the politics of China policy in the United States, with emphasis on the role of interest groups vis-a-vis Congress, the media, and other domestic institutions; the importance of domestic factors in U.S.-China economic conflicts; the combined impact of domestic factors in both China and the United States on the most important conflict of interest in U.S.-China relations -- the Taiwan issue.

Excerpt

Robert S. Ross

From the historic visits to Beijing by Henry Kissinger and Richard Nixon in the early 1970s to the demise of the Warsaw Pact and the end of the Cold War in 1989, the United States and China developed a very successful cooperative relationship. Despite the previous twenty years of animosity and numerous crises, Washington and Beijing rapidly joined forces to deal with their common Soviet adversary. They normalized diplomatic relations, conducted high-level strategic dialogues, engaged in bilateral arms transfers, and developed and expanded economic and cultural relations. They also coordinated policies to contend with Soviet policy in Indochina and Afghanistan. Simultaneously, they negotiated compromise solutions to serious conflicts of interests, including that over U.S. policy toward Taiwan, and shelved more intractable issues, such as ideological differences over human rights. In the context of common vital interests, American and Chinese leaders were able to forge a mutually beneficial relationship.

The era of U.S.-China cooperation reflected the unique dynamics of the latter half of the Cold War. It is now widely understood that in the aftermath of the Cold War, common strategic concerns, such as those that promoted U.S.-China cooperation, no longer compel nations to accommodate each other's interests and that absent any strategic imperative, domestic factors have become an increasingly important factor in foreign policy-making. This transformation is readily apparent in U.S. foreign policy. In the absence of the overriding Soviet threat, public opinion, interest groups, policy debates, and bureaucratic politics have all developed significant influence in the policy-making pro-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.