Urban Environments in Emerging Economies

Urban Environments in Emerging Economies

Urban Environments in Emerging Economies

Urban Environments in Emerging Economies

Synopsis

Those concerned with growth and development at national or local levels must pay significantly more attention to the physical structure of urban settings which house many of the leading sectors of the economies of nations. These metropolitan areas must retain the flexibility necessary to meet the needs of an ever-changing mix of activities. Structural, environmental, and economic concerns are brought together to help the reader better understand the problems and identify solutions. This work will be of interest to those economists, environmentalists, sociologists, and practitioners concerned with growth, change, and the environment in urban settings, as well as planning and development agencies in Third World settings.

Excerpt

In recent years economists and others concerned with growth and development in Third World settings have devoted considerable attention to urbanization. in some cases that attention has highlighted the city as a receptacle for surplus labor and, presumably, a conduit for the absorption of such surpluses into modern sector activities. This line of reasoning had its roots in the neoclassical synthesis and has produced an elegant body of theoretical material designed to supply logical scenarios concerning the shift in emphasis from rural to urban settings as development proceeds in Third World jurisdictions. No doubt this line of advance owes a considerable debt to the path-breaking work of W. Arthur Lewis (1954).

Another group of development specialists have focused their interests upon Third World cities as catalysts for social change. Their reasoning suggests that the necessities of survival in urban settings break down traditional attitudes, cultures, and ways of doing things in a manner that makes urban residents more amenable to change, thus providing a climate for economic expansion. the work of Bert Hosehtz was an early stimulus for this line of advance (1960).

In the years since Lewis and Hoselitz applied their stimuli, economists and other development specialists have come to regard urban complexes as focal points for the kinds of changes which have been occurring in the Third World. Cities are perceived as . . .

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