America's Competitive Secret: Using Women as a Management Strategy

America's Competitive Secret: Using Women as a Management Strategy

America's Competitive Secret: Using Women as a Management Strategy

America's Competitive Secret: Using Women as a Management Strategy

Synopsis

The United States has a large number of well educated, experienced professional women ready, willing and able to move into the boardrooms and executive suites of corporate America. Together they represent a great, untapped economic resource, a resource no other country in the world can claim. This is America's competitive secret, argues Judy B. Rosener in this refreshingly pragmatic new book for managers who want to improve their bottom line. A leading expert on women and men at work and a highly sought-after speaker, Rosener argues that not only are men and women different, so are male and female managers. Drawing on in-depth interviews with top-flight executives and middle managers and the latest research on working women and organizational change, she describes the unique contribution of female professionals. Her profiles of top women managers reveal that they cope well with ambiguity, are comfortable sharing power, and they tend to empower others-- leadership traits that Rosener contends lead to increased employee productivity, innovation, and profits. As businesses today struggle with corporate reorganization and an increasingly diverse workforce, America's Competive Secret offers compelling evidence that the changes that help organizatiions more fully utilize the talents of women are the same changes that will give them an important edge in today's fast-changing, service oriented, global workplace. Rosener explains why the so-called glass ceiling still prevents many competent women from reaching the upper echelons of management. She analyzes why women and men are perceived and evaluated differently at work, and provides new insight into the feelings of men who are asked to interact with women in new roles when there are few new rules. Rosener shows that removing the glass ceiling can no longer be viewed solely in terms of social equity--it is now an economic imperative. Too many American businesses have limited their economic strength by viewing the promotion of women employees only within the context of federally mandated affirmative action laws and policies. America's Competitive Secret redefines the issue for a new era, showing that America's most successful competitive strategy is one that most effectively utilizes all its human resources.

Excerpt

This book is intended for executives and managers who want to improve their organization's bottom line, and for women who wonder why their career paths so often seem to be shaped by the fact that they are female. It is also written for men who realize that women are in the workplace to stay and who want to understand the economic as well as social and psychological implications of having women as peers and competitors.

Much has been written about management strategy, human resources, and workplace issues associated with women. However, rarely have the three been studied to gether. I am convinced there is a common thread that runs through much of the research in these three areas, that of economic competitiveness. My purpose in writing this book has been to make that thread visible. I consider myself a synthesizer and translator. I have tried to avoid academic jargon and write in language that is easily understood and related to work practices and the bottom line.

Because there are always difficulties in translation, and because issues and data change rapidly, it is important to make some qualifications about the book's content. First, the data found in the tables and in the body of the book are as current as I could make them given the time lag between manuscript delivery and publication. Second, the two leadership styles discussed throughout the book, commandand-control and interactive, are "ideal types." That is, they represent two ends of a style continuum from authoritative . . .

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