Union Now: A Proposal for a Federal Union of the Democracies of the North Atlantic

Union Now: A Proposal for a Federal Union of the Democracies of the North Atlantic

Union Now: A Proposal for a Federal Union of the Democracies of the North Atlantic

Union Now: A Proposal for a Federal Union of the Democracies of the North Atlantic

Excerpt

Among the new things that drew my attention during my sojourn in the United States none struck me so strongly as the equality of conditions . . . The more I studied American society the more I saw the equality of conditions as the generating fact from which each detail descended . . . Then I turned my thoughts to our hemisphere, and it seemed to me that I distinguished something similar to the spectacle the new world offered . . .

A great democratic revolution is at work among us. Some hope still to stop it. Others judge it to be irresistible because it seems to them the most continuous, ancient and permanent fact known to history . . .

The crusader and the English wars decimated the nobles and divided their lands, the institution of the communes introduced democratic liberty in the bosom of feudal monarchy; the discovery of firearms equalized the villain and the noble on the battlefield; the printing press offered equal resources to their intelligence; the postman came to bring light to the door of the poor man's hut as to the palace gate; protestantism maintained that all men are equally qualified to find the road to heaven. The discovery of America presented a thousand new roads to fortune . . .

Everywhere we have seen the divers incidents of the life of peoples turn to the profit of democracy . . .

Shall democracy stop now that it is so strong and its adversaries to weak? . . .

The grandeur already achieved keeps us from seeing what yet may come.

The entire book one is about to read has been written in a sort of religious awe produced in the author's soul by the sight of this irresistible revolution which has marched on through so many centuries and through every obstacle, and which we see today yet advancing . . .

The . . . peoples seem to me to present today a terrifying spectacle; . . . their fate is in their hands; but soon it will escape them.

To instruct the democracy, to revive, if possible, its beliefs, purify its practices, regulate its movements; to replace little by little its inexperience with science and its blind instincts with knowledge of its true interests; to adapt its government to the times and conditions, to modify it according . . .

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