The Negro Genius: A New Appraisal of the Achievement of the American Negro in Literature and the Fine Arts

The Negro Genius: A New Appraisal of the Achievement of the American Negro in Literature and the Fine Arts

The Negro Genius: A New Appraisal of the Achievement of the American Negro in Literature and the Fine Arts

The Negro Genius: A New Appraisal of the Achievement of the American Negro in Literature and the Fine Arts

Excerpt

About the Negro in the United States two things are observable. One is that distinction so far won by members of the race has been most frequently in the arts. The other is that, aside from enforced labor, any influence exerted on civilization has been mainly in the field of æsthetics. As to the first point, we might refer to a long line of beautiful singers, to the sensuous poetry of Dunbar, the picturesque style of DuBois, the mysticism of the paintings of Tanner, and to the striving of many younger artists. Even Booker T. Washington, most practical of men, is largely remembered for his anecdote and vivid illustration. The influence on the country's life will be referred to more than once as we proceed.

If one has taken note of the homes of Negro peasants in the South, he must have observed that the instinct for beauty insists upon an outlet. If no better picture is available, there will be a flaming advertisement on the walls. Few homes have not at least a rosebush in the garden or a geranium on the windowsill. Conversely, those things that are most picturesque make to the Negro the readiest appeal. Faust has been popular with those who would never . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.