Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln: A Contribution to the Religious, Political and Intellectual History of the Thirteenth Century

Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln: A Contribution to the Religious, Political and Intellectual History of the Thirteenth Century

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Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln: A Contribution to the Religious, Political and Intellectual History of the Thirteenth Century

Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln: A Contribution to the Religious, Political and Intellectual History of the Thirteenth Century

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Grosseteste's connection with the Friars--Origin of the Dominicans and Franciscans--Their arrival in England--Settlement at Oxford--Grosseteste's lectures at the Franciscan School--His subsequent relations with the two Orders--Friendship with John de St. Giles and with Adam Marsh.

BEFORE passing to the circumstances which induced Grosseteste at the end of 1231 or beginning of 1232 to relinquish most of his ecclesiastical duties and to restrict in a large measure the sphere of his activity, it is necessary to give some account of his relations with the two orders of Friars which, making their appearance on these shores a few years previous to that date, had begun to rouse England out of the moral and spiritual lethargy into which she had been plunged at the time of the Great Interdict, to appeal to new social strata barely touched by existing organisations, and to teach men that religion was as compatible with a life of activity as with a life of contemplation. It is among Grosseteste's merits that he was one of the first to divine the new ideas thus presented to the world, and to encourage and guide the new forces thus called into existence.

The first Dominicans landed in England in 1220, the first Franciscans in 1224; and in view of the fact that they both sought Grosseteste's protection and advice, and that to both he remained a firm and faithful friend, though specially associated with the latter as the earliest reader to their school at Oxford, it is desirable to refer briefly to the origin and importance of the two orders, as well as to their introduction into this country and their settlement at the University in which he was the foremost scholar.

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