Soviet Policy and the Chinese Communists, 1931-1946

Soviet Policy and the Chinese Communists, 1931-1946

Soviet Policy and the Chinese Communists, 1931-1946

Soviet Policy and the Chinese Communists, 1931-1946

Excerpt

In 1944 and 1945 Stalin and Molotov are reported to have made disparaging remarks about the Chinese Communists on several occasions. Theso remarks were perplexing at the time and continue to be so. In June, 1944, for instance, Stalin told W. Averell Harriman, the American Ambassador in Moscow, that "the Chinese Communists are not real Communists. They are 'margarine' Communists." In August of the same year Molotov made similar remarks about the Chinese Communists to Patrick Hurley and Donald Nelson, President Roosevelt's two personal representatives to Chungking. Nelson reported Molotov's observations as follows:

Although he said that the Soviet government had unjustifiably been held responsible for various happenings in China during recent years, Molotov stressed that it would bear no responsibility for internal affairs or developments in China. Molotov then spoke of the very impoverished conditions of the people in parts of China, some of whom called themselves Communists but were related to Communism in no way at all. It was merely a way of expressing dissatisfaction with their economic condition and they would forget this political inclination when their economic condition improved. The Soviet government should not be associated with these "communist elements" nor could it in any way be blamed for this situation.

Eight months later, in April, 1945, Ambassador Hurley, again in Moscow on his way to Chungking, drew from the Soviet leaders further confirmation of the official Russian view that the Communists in China were not real Communists in the Soviet . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.