Educating the Expert Society

Educating the Expert Society

Educating the Expert Society

Educating the Expert Society

Excerpt

In the middle of the twentieth century, education in the United States without doubt has become a problem of national scope. A sense of crisis is shaped by the convergence of three great phenomena: rapid change in modern science and technology, a high birth rate at home, and the expanding thrust of totalitarianism abroad. The atomic age presses against education at a time when the number of students is doubling and tripling and the nation is committed to the winning of a cold war. With this convergence, many citizens and officials feel that educational inadequacies are enormously detrimental, that conceivably they may cost our freedom or even our lives.

More than before, the strengthening of schools and colleges is seen as a means of solving national problems, of securing the national welfare, and there is every sign this concern will increase in the decades to come. We see this interest exemplified in the case of a former president of Harvard University, later United States ambassador to West Germany, studying high schools in the United States and suggesting universal standards. There is a growing inter-

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