Integrating Study Abroad into the Undergraduate Liberal Arts Curriculum: Eight Institutional Case Studies

Integrating Study Abroad into the Undergraduate Liberal Arts Curriculum: Eight Institutional Case Studies

Integrating Study Abroad into the Undergraduate Liberal Arts Curriculum: Eight Institutional Case Studies

Integrating Study Abroad into the Undergraduate Liberal Arts Curriculum: Eight Institutional Case Studies

Synopsis

This book deals with an issue of increasing concern to college educators--the relationship of study abroad to the home campus curriculum. All too often, American undergraduates find that their study abroad experience has little relation to their home campus studies. The eight case studies presented herein provide the insight necessary to help college educators and administrators successfully internationalize their student's degree programs.

Excerpt

Barbara B. Burn

The eight case studies presented in this volume describe activities undertaken in as many colleges and universities as part of what was called the Study Abroad Articulation Project (SAAP). It had as its overall objectives (1) to identify factors, circumstances, and attitudes that prevent study abroad by American undergraduates from being an important and integral part of their total degree program or for some even excluded by it prevent participation in such programs, and (2) to identify and encourage institutional strategies and policies aimed at eliminating or at least reducing these obstacles. The underlying aim of the project was to strengthen international studies and the internationalization of undergraduate education in the United States by making study abroad more important to and recognized within it.

The Articulation Project was launched in January 1987. It concluded with a two-day workshop held in Amherst, Massachusetts in February 1989. At the workshop the issues raised by the eight SAAP institutions were presented and discussed with project consultants and with the two-person teams sent by eight additional colleges and universities. These institutions were invited to send representatives because of their known commitment to and experience with the integration of study abroad into undergraduate students' degree programs. Appendix I lists the eight original SAAP institutions, the additional eight participating in the February 1989 workshop, and project consultants.

The Study Abroad Articulation Project grew out of an earlier research undertaking, the so-called Study Abroad Evaluation Project (SAEP), especially certain findings of the latter project. The first paper in this volume, written by the chief researcher for the SAEP, Professor Jerry S. Carlson of the University of California at Riverside, highlights aspects of the U.S. involvement in this major five-country, five-year undertaking.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.