America, Nation or Confusion: A Study of Our Immigration Problems

America, Nation or Confusion: A Study of Our Immigration Problems

America, Nation or Confusion: A Study of Our Immigration Problems

America, Nation or Confusion: A Study of Our Immigration Problems

Excerpt

It may seem necessary to explain why it is desirable to add another book on the immigration question, particularly when the Act of 1924 seems to become every day more firmly established as the policy of the country. Many of us, indeed, have been surprised at the power of the sentiment behind the Johnson Act. Much as some of us may have desired it and believe in it, its vitality, in the face of the enormous pressure of the old sentiments and the economic interests in favor of free immigration, has been a matter of genuine surprise. But we must not deceive ourselves with its apparent strength. In the first place, it has had powerful, adventitious aids. To mention one only, the outcry of employers for common labor has been measurably diminished by the fact that the law allows Mexicans to enter without restriction by the quota law. Moreover, there has been much illicit immigration. The pressure has been diminished from the rear. Yet the Mexican is a more unassimilable alien, perhaps, than any from southern or eastern Europe. We cannot call the quota law established until it applies to Mexico, Central and South America as well as to Europe and Asia. Until this is achieved, it is still an experimental policy.

Moreover, there is reason to believe that at present the opinion against free immigration is at its height . . .

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