The Story of a Carillon: Being an Account of a Token of Friendship from the Nestlae Company to Provide a Carillon for the Presbyterian Church of Stamford, Connecticut, U.S.A

The Story of a Carillon: Being an Account of a Token of Friendship from the Nestlae Company to Provide a Carillon for the Presbyterian Church of Stamford, Connecticut, U.S.A

The Story of a Carillon: Being an Account of a Token of Friendship from the Nestlae Company to Provide a Carillon for the Presbyterian Church of Stamford, Connecticut, U.S.A

The Story of a Carillon: Being an Account of a Token of Friendship from the Nestlae Company to Provide a Carillon for the Presbyterian Church of Stamford, Connecticut, U.S.A

Excerpt

The bells will be cast when the present War gives way to peace. The carillon will be electrically connected with a fine pipe organ, now located in the Presbyterian Church at Stamford, Connecticut, in order that not only hymns and other music can be played on the entire peal, but also change- ringing in the English style may be employed on the first eight bells.

Each bell will have its name, the date of entry into the Confederation, a religious symbol, and an appropriate inscription dealing with the geography, history, products, mountains or rivers of the region. The name will appear near the waist of the bell, below will be the symbol, then will follow the inscription near the sound bow. In every case there will be only one inscription, whatever be the tongue employed. The approximated translations in English which occur in the following descriptions will not appear on the bells.

The religious symbols are as follows: for Switzerland herself, the Trefoil, as representing the Trinity; Zurich has the crossed keys of St. Peter; Berne, the bear, beloved by the world's children; Lucerne, the Chi Rho monogram; Uri bears the Angel for St. Matthew; Schwyz carries the winged bull for St. Luke; Obwald, the St. Andrew Cross; Nidwald will have cast into its bell a very old Greek symbol for Christ the Victor; Glaris will bear the fleur-de-lys for the Virgin Mary; Zoug, the clasped hands for marriage; Fribourg, the primitive Greek monogram of Christos Nika, Christ the Victor; Soleure, the eagle of St. John; Bâle-Ville, the sword and Pilgrim's shell of St. James; Bâle-Campagne will have the Lorraine Cross; Schaffhouse, the font for Baptism; Appenzell-Rhodes Intérieures, the Cross of Iona; Appenzell-Rhodes Extérieures, the inverted cross and crossed keys of St. Peter; St. Gall, the square and rose of St. Joseph; Grisons has the Paschal Lamb; Argovie, the crossed swords of St. Paul; Thurgovie has the Winged Lion of St. Mark; Tessin, the crossed fishes for St. Andrew; Vaud, the chalice for the Holy Communion; Valais will bear the upraised sword of the martyred St. Maurice; Neuchâtel, the Maltese Cross as a symbol of Mediterranean culture and Christianity; and Genève, the Dove of the Holy Spirit.

No attempt has been made to fit each symbol to the cantonal names, rather to cast into the bells symbols which are appropriate for the peal as a whole. Thus we have The Trinity, the Four Evangelists, the Holy Family, various Saints, the Two Sacraments, and marriage represented.

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