Social Security: Universal or Selective?

Social Security: Universal or Selective?

Social Security: Universal or Selective?

Social Security: Universal or Selective?

Excerpt

How to provide for the aged, the disabled, and the dependent is a problem in every society. Many are the proposals, but a lasting solution is elusive. The American social security system was devised during the great depression of the 1930s as one way to meet the problem. It has wide acceptance. Yet, it is being increasingly questioned--by some for inequities and insufficiencies that have resulted as its welfare features have been expanded, and by others because this expansion has not been carried far enough. Some experts doubt that the present program can be changed to meet growing social and economic complexities.

Professor Cohen finds that the social security system "is certainly not the only way . . . and certainly not the final answer. But it is a reasonably good approach for this economy, and one which is susceptible to incremental improvements over time as our productivity and gross national product increase."

Professor Friedman may capsulize the divergence of solutions, when he says, "The fundamental issue is: as we look toward the future, do we want our society to develop in such a way that individuals separately will have greater responsibility or do we want it to develop . . .

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