The Ku Klux Klan: A Study of the American Mind

The Ku Klux Klan: A Study of the American Mind

The Ku Klux Klan: A Study of the American Mind

The Ku Klux Klan: A Study of the American Mind

Excerpt

In 1873 the Ku Klux Klan, outside the South, was a synonym for the most sinister and dangerous forces in American life. In the North it was associated with clandestine murder and masked rebellion. Who then would have dared to prophesy that within less than half a century this secret, oath-bound order would be revived and spread to every section of the country? Such, however, is the fact. The modern Klan was organized by William J. Simmons in 1915, enjoyed a precarious existence for several years, suddenly assumed proportions of national importance in 1920, survived the attack of the powerful New York World and a searching investigation by a committee of Congress, and to-day boasts of a following that is numbered in hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions. The rise of the modern Klan is the most spectacular of all the social movements in American society since the close of the World War. It . . .

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