Turkey: Ancient Miniatures

Turkey: Ancient Miniatures

Turkey: Ancient Miniatures

Turkey: Ancient Miniatures

Excerpt

Of all the schools of painting which existed in the Near and Middle East during the Islamic period, that of Turkey is least known. While there are weighty tomes and many learned articles about Persian miniatures and the paintings of Mughal India, and even a good many publications on the painting of the Arabs, very little has been written about the pictorial production of the Turks. All that is available to us to date are a number of plates in general surveys of the field, and a handful of publications, and even here the information contained in them is scant and sometimes erroneous.

Why is it that a nation of such historical importance, whose splendid achievements in the fields of architecture, carpet weaving, pottery and tile making are well known and universally recognized, has been so neglected in the West with regard to this particular branch of its art? One of the major reasons is the fact that there was, and still is, very little first-rate or well documented material in European museums and libraries, and probably even less in those of the United States. The vast majority of it has remained in Turkey where it was at first almost inaccessible, being housed in the palace libraries of the sultans, who were still reigning when the first major works on the painting of the Muslim Near East were written. After the establishment of the Republic under Atatürk, manuscripts and paintings became more readily available, but the vastness of the collections yielded only slowly to the research of the few scholars interested in the subject. In view of this situation . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.