The Enemy Camp

The Enemy Camp

The Enemy Camp

The Enemy Camp

Excerpt

"Let us add another story, closely connected with this theme, which Seneca relates in one of his Epistles. 'You know,' he says, writing to Lucilius, 'that Harpaste, my wife's fool, was left on my hands as a hereditary charge, for I have a natural aversion to these monsters; and if I have a mind to laugh at a fool, I need not seek him far, I can laugh at myself. This fool has suddenly lost her sight. I am telling you a strange but true story. She is not aware that she is blind, and constantly urges her keeper to take her out, because she says my house is dark. What we laugh at in her I pray you to believe happens to every, one of us; no one knows himself to be avaricious or covetous. The blind at least call for a guide, while we go astray of our own accord. I am not ambitious, we say, but in Rome one cannot live otherwise; I am not a spendthrift, but the city requires a great outlay; it is not my fault if I am choleric, if I have not yet settled upon a definite course of life; it is the fault of youth. Let us not seek our disease outside of ourselves, it is within us, it is implanted in our bowels. And the mere fact that we do not perceive ourselves to be sick makes our cure more difficult.'"

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