To Win These Rights: A Personal Story of the CIO in the South

To Win These Rights: A Personal Story of the CIO in the South

To Win These Rights: A Personal Story of the CIO in the South

To Win These Rights: A Personal Story of the CIO in the South

Excerpt

This is my story about the CIO in the South these past fifteen years. It is partly an account of my own small share in the movement, and partly what I could draw directly from many persons with whom I have worked. It is honest reporting, from them and from me.

The South still has heavy concern with the ideas of an earlier period; it faces too slowly the new times and new needs. Yet in our shadowed democracy there grows among the people a brave determination to produce human equality and justice.

It has been my good fortune to be associated closely with that welling-up of promise in the South, wherein men and women have sought a tool with which to win their hopes.

My years with the industrial unions of the CIO have taught me that out of them come the true aristocrats of our times: leaders who earnestly seek to serve their fellow men.

Few are the books, however small, which make their way into print without help from many people. My own indebtedness reaches to scores of friends, and my gratitude to them travels about with me. Some have been so very generous of time and helpfulness that their names should be written out. Among them are Josephine Wilkins, Rebecca Gershon, George Sinclair Mitchell, Mrs. Charles W. Skinner, Richard Conn (who first suggested the whole idea), David S. Burgess and John G. Ramsay, who read the manuscript bit by bit. Director John V. Riffe and all his staff gave me encourage-

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