Through Science to Philosophy

Through Science to Philosophy

Through Science to Philosophy

Through Science to Philosophy

Excerpt

This book is based on a course of lectures, bearing the same title, which were given at the Lowell Institute, Boston, Mass., in January 1936. In adapting the lectures for publication I have, after making certain trivial alterations, modified them in three respects. First, the order of development of the ideas has been somewhat changed--an improvement made possible by release from the necessity, inevitably imposed by the conditions of a lecture course, of dividing the material into a given number of approximately equal portions, each dealing with a single theme. Secondly, the treatment of certain portions of the subject has been amplified as the result of conversations, both in England and in America, with those who have been interested in the point of view described. I take this opportunity of recording my gratitude for the many suggestions for improvement and expressions of interest which the lectures elicited. And thirdly, I have added in Chapter XIV an adaptation of a portion of the Sixth Joseph Henry Lecture, delivered before the Philosophical Society of Washington on February 1st, 1936, and published in the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences, May 15th, 1936. This has been almost entirely rewritten to bring the treatment into relation with the general scheme of the book, but the substance is unchanged.

The ideas presented in the book may be regarded as a development of those contained in my earlier work, Science and Human Experience (Williams & Norgate, 1931). There is little, if anything, in that book which I would wish to withdraw, but the attainment of a more fundamental viewpoint calls for some re-expression. The more radical conception of Science now reached, and its relation to the definition formerly given, are explained in Chapter I, from which, I think, the direction of development will be clearly understood by any who have read the earlier book; those who have not will, of course, feel no need of reconciliation.

Finally, it is a pleasure to acknowledge my deep appreciation of the great kindness and consideration shown me by . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.