The Lost World

The Lost World

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The Lost World

The Lost World

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Spectators with a mechanical turn of mind may solve for themselves the question of how the gigantic monsters are made to galumph and cavort in "The Lost World." Others will simply enjoy for itself this extraordinary film, made from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fine story of adventure. It does not matter greatly whether the actual models were six inches tall or sixty feet high--contrasted with the terrified explorers they look like Woolworth Buildings overshadowing a group of bungalows.

There are so many good points in the film that it is almost unkind to point out its one weakness. The fight between Professor Challenger and the reporter, Malone; the scenes in the South American jungle; the clever animals in the early part of the picture--especially the admirable and intelligent little monkey who has such an important rôle; the fight between the two gigantic animals, and the manner in which one of them nonchalantly plucks a pterodactyl out of the sky--these and the rampage of the brontosaurus through London are altogether amusing and exciting. The film is mostly faithful to Doyle's narrative, and where it departs from it the departures, with one exception, are wise.

But the producer had to put in an unnecessary heroine and the flattest of love stories. Are movie spectators as insistent on these sentimental invasions as the producers seem to think? The men who made this picture were convinced that the full horror of the approach of the gigantic prehistoric beasts could only be conveyed by showing, over and again, close-ups of the frightened face of Miss Bessie Love. She looked just as scared as she would have looked if a mouse had been drawing near.

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