A Manual of Organizational Development: The Psychology of Change

A Manual of Organizational Development: The Psychology of Change

A Manual of Organizational Development: The Psychology of Change

A Manual of Organizational Development: The Psychology of Change

Synopsis

A practical guide to the essentials of organisational change which makes complex concepts accessible to managers, consultants, human resources professionals and others. Includes a directory of further sources of information and assistance.

Excerpt

Organizations are now experiencing massive changes and for prolonged periods. Whether we observe this as customers, clients, suppliers, employees, or managers, we know that the changes are not superficial. By the end of this millennium, organizations that are fit to survive will need to learn how to transform themselves continuously in order to adapt to, and shape, their environments.

Managing the processes of change is complex. It requires an understanding of the messy, emotional aspects of transition. The best plans can go astray when people do not embrace change and are not helped to manage their feelings about it. Successful management of change requires attention to both the "what" and the "how" of change.

In managing change and organizational development, executives may find it hard to step outside the organization's current culture, and so they get caught up in "improving what we already do", rather than reviewing "what else we should be doing". Managers therefore often seek help from consultants, so that they can move to a new frame of reference and begin to imagine new possibilities. Consultants may be involved from initially facilitating the formulation of the strategic plan, through to the process of implementation.

If managers intend to work with a consultant, they need to understand what it is that the change process demands and what the consultant can offer. This is not easy for the manager, who has the dual task of specifying what the consultant is to do, whilst not producing such a tight brief that the consultant cannot exercise her or his expertise. For consultants and human resources professionals, too, the task is daunting. How can they . . .

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