An Aristotelian Theory of Comedy, with an Adaptation of the Poetics, and a Translation of the Tractatus Coislinianus

An Aristotelian Theory of Comedy, with an Adaptation of the Poetics, and a Translation of the Tractatus Coislinianus

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An Aristotelian Theory of Comedy, with an Adaptation of the Poetics, and a Translation of the Tractatus Coislinianus

An Aristotelian Theory of Comedy, with an Adaptation of the Poetics, and a Translation of the Tractatus Coislinianus

Read FREE!

Excerpt

So that as an imitator Sophocles will be on one side akin to Homer, since both represent higher types of character; and on another to Aristophanes, since both represent persons as acting and doing.

Aristotle, Poetics, chapter 3

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I
THE INVESTIGATION OF LITERARY TYPES

An investigation into the nature of comedy falls within the province of the study of literary genera or types, a subject in which students of ancient, mediaeval, and modern literature should alike be interested. And yet not many such types have been methodically examined. We have, indeed, the masterly work of Hirzel entitled Der Dialog; with which, in point of excellence, we may class Rohde Der Griechische Roman, and perhaps The New Greek Comedy of Legrand. More speculative, not to say fanciful, is the nevertheless valuable work of Reich, Der Mimus, which is stimulating and not neglectful of detail, though here and there building too elaborately where the basis of fact is necessarily slender. To these we may add Das Literarische Porträt der Griechen by Ivo Bruns; the Geschichte der Autobiographie by Misch; and Werner Lyrik und Lyriker. A few other volumes might be noted, as that of Greg on Pastoral Drama, and that of Anna Robeson Burr on The Autobiography. The list could not be greatly . . .

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