The Queen's Husband

The Queen's Husband

The Queen's Husband

The Queen's Husband

Excerpt

In his review of my play, "The Road to Rome," in the London Observer, St. John Ervine wrote: "One may not unfairly say that it bears on it all the marks of a democracy which, oppressed by its lack of great men, consoles itself by pretending that the great men of the past were poor mutts in reality. But sneers are the arguments of slaves. Conquered or servile people become expert in the use of their tongues and are able to make their masters look stupid. Their masters, however, remain their masters, and the sneers, although they can annoy and irritate, fail to alter facts. Mr. Sherwood, dismayed by the democracy which enables boobs, hicks, mutts and hayseeds to become persons in authority, throws up his hands in despair and decides that there can never have been great men in any country at any time. . . . It must have been in Rome, Mr. Sherwood concludes, as it is in America, and on that conclusion his play is founded."

We hear but infrequently from abroad the statement that Americans are a servile people. We have been laboriously denounced as a nation of braggarts, bounders, extravagant show-offs . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.