The St. Louis Movement in Philosophy: Some Source Material

The St. Louis Movement in Philosophy: Some Source Material

The St. Louis Movement in Philosophy: Some Source Material

The St. Louis Movement in Philosophy: Some Source Material

Excerpt

Much of the material included in this volume was collected by Mr. Cleon Forbes in connection with the preparation of a master's thesis on the St. Louis Movement written under the direction of the Department of Philosophy of the University of Oklahoma. As the work progressed it was a matter of some surprise to see on the one hand how deeply the Movement was grounded historically, how wide was its scope, and how far its influence had extended; and on the other hand how much investigation remained to be made. It became apparent too as the thesis was prepared that material was being collected that should be preserved and made available to others.

Though the necessities of classification have placed this material on the University Press list as a Study, its nature is made evident by the title. It is source material. Some of the letters in the collection are valuable only as corroborative evidence; several possess little value save the negative one of showing the unproductiveness of certain leads. These sources have been edited according to the accepted custom regarding such material. No changes have been made in the original contents except those demanded by clearness or unity: the italicizing of titles of works mentioned in the letters, a few minor changes in punctuation, the omission of salutations and felicitations unrelated to the general subject. Letters and interviews containing general information have been placed first; those concerned mainly with single figures following, grouped in order: Brokmeyer, Harris, Snider. It should be noted that the bibliography included is tentative and suggestive only, making no claim to being exhaustive; since it has been compiled to some extent from secondary sources it can hardly hope to be letter-perfect.

The need of gathering and preserving letters, interviews, and other unpublished sources connected with the history of American thought has long been urged by scholars in that field of philosophy. In the case of the St. Louis Movement the urgency is obvious. Many of the informants are aged and another month may make much of their material forever un-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.