China and Foreign Powers: An Historical Review of Their Relations

China and Foreign Powers: An Historical Review of Their Relations

China and Foreign Powers: An Historical Review of Their Relations

China and Foreign Powers: An Historical Review of Their Relations

Excerpt

In July 1925 the Institute of Pacific Relations gathered at a Conference at Honolulu persons from various countries bordering on the Pacific Ocean to discuss the social and political questions of that region. Parties came from the United States, Japan, China, Korea, the Philippines, Hawaii, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Before adjourning, it was decided to hold a second Conference at Honolulu in July 1927, at which it was thought desirable to secure the presence of some persons from Great Britain who would be qualified to take part in the discussions. The Royal Institute of International Affairs was accordingly invited to arrange for the presence of such persons.

In answering this invitation the Institute drew attention to Clause 5 of its Charter, which provides that 'The Institute, as such, shall not express an opinion on any aspect of International Affairs'. In view of this clause it was pointed out that no one could be sent from Great Britain to represent the Institute, which exists to facilitate research on the part of its members and cannot under its Charter formulate views as a corporate body. On this clear understanding the Institute agreed to take the initiative in gathering together a party of persons qualified to take part in the Conference on their own individual authority, and to place at their disposal its resources and facilities for research.

The party thus constituted at once applied itself to the study of the subjects on the Agenda for the Conference. Sir Frederick Whyte, a member of the party, undertook to prepare a memorandum on the history of British relations with China, the final draft of which was the result of a series of discussions with other members.

The Council of the Institute feel that this brief history of British relations with China may be useful to others who are trying to follow the course of events in the Far East. They have therefore made arrangements with the Oxford University Press . . .

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