English Literature in Its Foreign Relations, 1300 to 1800

English Literature in Its Foreign Relations, 1300 to 1800

English Literature in Its Foreign Relations, 1300 to 1800

English Literature in Its Foreign Relations, 1300 to 1800

Excerpt

Teachers and teachers' teachers are becoming united in the opinion that the study of English literature will then be most accurate and profitable when it is founded on a European basis. Its students should retrace the path which its makers, courtly and popular, have followed through the centuries. Thus, Sir Henry Newbolt, to quote an authority at once expert and recent, says: "What can be done is to provide, on whatever scale, a map of the long course of literature as it flows through the English landscape. It will not be a map of out own island merely," he adds, "but a survey of the inhabited world." How far, if at all, the contents of this volume supply the kind of information thus indicated its readers will judge; my object has been to place the successive chapters of English literature, between 1300 and 1800, in relation to the literary history of other countries. The survey stops short of the nineteenth century: the influence of Byron and Victor Hugo, the Scandinavian revival, Russia's awakening, Darwinism, and other manifestations, seem to me to require a larger scale than has here been adopted. Perhaps I may make that attempt later on. The material for both "maps" was collected in my Dictionary of European Literature (1926), and I have utilized some paragraphs of a little book, now out of print, which I wrote in 1906 on How to Read English Literature. Earlier still, in a contribution to National Education (1901), I wrote: "If the new learning is to replace the old in out national system . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.