The Correspondence of Nicholas Biddle

The Correspondence of Nicholas Biddle

Read FREE!

The Correspondence of Nicholas Biddle

The Correspondence of Nicholas Biddle

Read FREE!

Excerpt

No apology is necessary in presenting to the public the following correspondence of Nicholas Biddle, President of the Second Bank of the United States. From 1804 to 1839 he was almost constantly engaged in some official capacity with national or state administrations; and throughout his whole life, until his death in 1844, he was intimately in touch with the leading statesmen of the day. These years embrace a most, eventful epoch in the history of our nation. The purchase of Louisiana, the War of 1812, the financial and commercial readjustment following the conflict, the establishment of the Second Bank of the United States, the organization and development of its power, the long struggle with President Jackson, the re-charter of the institution by the State of Pennsylvania, the panic of 1837, the Sub-Treasury and President Van Buren, the appeal of Texas for annexation, the whirlwind election of 1840, the rupture between Tyler and the Whigs, the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, and the preparation for the heated campaign of 1844 -- all fall within the scope of Nicholas Biddle's life; and with all these movements the great financier was more than an interested spectator. Not only was he in close communication with those in power, but in many instances he was the center of operations; and on all occasions he displayed the sterling, stalwart qualities which have marked the Biddles of Pennsylvania one of the most distinguished families in our land.

Since their entrance into America, now more than two centuries ago, the Biddles have been active in the service of the country. Their advent was contemporaneous with that of William Penn, for the original ancestor, William Biddle, accompanied Penn to the new province. They bore their part in the privations and aspirations of the early settlers; and in the Revolution they gave their best in blood and brains to further the cause of democracy. Charles Biddle, the father of Nicholas, was, at the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.