D. H. Lawrence: The Failure and the Triumph of Art

D. H. Lawrence: The Failure and the Triumph of Art

D. H. Lawrence: The Failure and the Triumph of Art

D. H. Lawrence: The Failure and the Triumph of Art

Excerpt

This study is not concerned with Lawrence the man. His life has been thoroughly examined by a large number of biographers, friendly and unfriendly; he has been psychoanalyzed, criticized, evaluated, loved in public posthumously; he has been worshipped from a distance as the lovable angel that at times he was, and he has been despised as the demon that he also was. His every move has been charted, his reading scrutinized, his formidable battles with his wife recorded, and his novels have been corrected by checking them against the facts he used as matter for them. We know he cooked, trimmed hats for Frieda, built chicken coops, baked bread in old-fashioned ovens and fell into sadistic tantrums; and we also know that he could be tender after his explosions. Sometimes the same event has been recorded by several hands--the "last supper" episode at the Café Royal, for instance.

A distinguished English philosopher of our age, Bertrand Russell, has put on record his intense dislike of, and his utter failure to understand, Lawrence; an English economist, John Maynard Keynes, from the lofty height of his aesthetic and intellectual superiority, condescended to notice Lawrence's reactions to the economist's precious set of aesthetes. Recently his most indefatigable biographer, Harry T. Moore, has added to two very useful books on Lawrence a third; and more recently still, another biographer, Edward H. Nehls, has given us a very valuable composite biography in three volumes. If there is information on his life that has been overlooked, letters that have not yet been printed, surviving relatives and friends not yet interviewed, vital . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.