Germany Divided: The Legacy of the Nazi Era

Germany Divided: The Legacy of the Nazi Era

Germany Divided: The Legacy of the Nazi Era

Germany Divided: The Legacy of the Nazi Era

Excerpt

Anglo-German relations have understandably generated a great deal of emotion on both sides of the Channel. But in the present state of the world, indulgence in prejudice and emotion is a luxury we cannot afford; and if we have any regard for our safety, we shall be well advised to base our policy on rational thinking. Generals are often accused of wishing to fight the last war and we should be making the same mistake if, rooted in the past, we failed to perceive what changes time has wrought in the international scene. There are, in particular, four considerations to which I should like to draw attention.

In the first place, it is undeniable that recent technical progress has made it impossible for a nation of sixty millions, however highly developed its industry, to pursue an independent foreign and military policy. We can apprehend from our own experience how impossible it is for Germany to create her own nuclear armory, rocketry, armored divisions, navies and all the other equipment which a modern belligerent requires. With every year the task becomes more massive, and it may soon strain the resources of America with all her Nato allies.

The conclusion to be reached is that Germany singlehanded does not present the same danger as she did in 1939. On the other hand, Germany represents an important accession of strength to the Western Alliance; and conversely, the position of Russia would be enormously reinforced if Germany could be attracted into the Soviet orbit. In these circumstances it would be madness so to conduct our affairs as to drive Germany away from the West and into the arms of Russia.

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