Jesus and the Greeks: Or, Early Christianity in the Tideway of Hellenism

Jesus and the Greeks: Or, Early Christianity in the Tideway of Hellenism

Jesus and the Greeks: Or, Early Christianity in the Tideway of Hellenism

Jesus and the Greeks: Or, Early Christianity in the Tideway of Hellenism

Excerpt

In rabbinical circles, prior to the Christian era, all who were not "Jews" were placed in the category of "Greeks," Judaism being regarded as the only true religion, and all other religions as false. So, too, in later times, and in Christian circles, the relations between Christianity and other religions were conceived as distinctly hostile, the non-Christian faiths of the world being viewed as utterly devoid of truth or merit. Thus the good Dean Prideaux could still speak of Zoroaster as "this famous impostor," and says of him and of Mahomet, "Both of them were very crafty knaves." And in general no milder epithets were applied to Buddha and Confucius. All alike were put under the ban as deceivers and apostles of error. This standpoint has been practically abandoned. Not only so, but there is now a marked tendency in the opposite direction. The comparative study of religions has led to widespread recognition of elements of good in all religions, but just on this very account it becomes the more necessary to emphasize the essential independence of Christianity, which, under the new conditions, is apt to be erroneously considered as a mere incident in the progress of moral evolution.

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