The Making of Burma

The Making of Burma

The Making of Burma

The Making of Burma

Excerpt

The 4th of January 1948 was the most memorable day of my life. On that day, at 4 o'clock in the morning, I was privileged to take part in the celebrations of the transfer of sovereign power from Great Britain to the Union of Burma. To this deeply moving experience I was able to add others in many parts of Burma in the course of three more visits to the country; to the Kachin States and the Chin Hills; to the Naga areas and the Shan States. Again and again I met friends who outlined to me the history of their own area; the Sama Duwa Sinwa Nawng, Duwa Zau Rip, U Zan Hta Sin and Major Shan Lone in the Kachin States; Sao Saimong and Mi Mi Khaing in the Shan States; Vum Ko Hau in the Chin Hills. None of them have the slightest responsibility for what I have written, but I am greatly indebted to them for the interest they stimulated as well as for the data with which they supplied me.

The self-appointed task of telling the story of the making of Burma up to the point when, in October 1960, she acquired a complete frontier was made easier and happier by the encouragement and friendship of Burmese scholars; of Dr. Maung Maung, author of Burma in the Family of Nations and The Constitution of Burma; Dr. Hla Pe, Reader in Burmese at the School of Oriental Studies and chief editor of a new Burmese-English Dictionary; U Tet Htoot, who is supervising the printing of the Encylopedia Burmanica; Ma Thoung, Khin Maung Nyunt, Dr. Yi Yi, all colleagues in the India Office Library whilst working for their Ph. Ds., and Thet Tun for his M.A. There are also British scholars; the late J. S. Furnivall, who gave me much helpful advice in the early stages of the book and who, a few days before he died in July 1960, repeated the encouragement which has endeared so many students to him, and Dr. D. G. E. Hall, who has been generous enough to allow me to consult him on specific points. None of them shares any responsibility for the views I have expressed nor for the errors which I may have made.

The Making of Burma could not have been written without access to the unrivalled documentation in the India Office Library in London. I am specially indebted to Mr. S. C. Sutton, its Director, to Mrs. Molly Poulter, and to Mr. D. Matthews, in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.