In Darkest Germany

In Darkest Germany

In Darkest Germany

In Darkest Germany

Excerpt

This is a remarkable book. In a time when the individual has been lost in the mass and when ideals are regarded largely as a means to mislead and deceive, we have, in Victor Gollancz, a man who can still think and speak of human beings, rather than of Germans, Jews or Russians, and to whom the ideals of our Christian heritage are sacred.

The picture of misery and despair which this book reflects is based on first-hand information gathered during October and November, 1946. It is unfortunately necessary to report that conditions one year later will probably be little better, and may even be worse. Although the Directives issued July 15th, 1947, to General Clay represent at their face value a complete change of policy from that prescribed in the Directives of May, 1945, they may prove to be equally futile and unworkable. Orders, even if issued from the highest levels, provide in themselves no guarantee that they will have the desired effect, and while Washington now wisely gives the Germans the right to find their own form of democracy, there are still many conditions attached to their freedom of action.

General Clay is told that we are seeking a "loose federal government for Germany." What constitutes in the eyes of Washington and General Clay a too-centralized form of government? Would the Weimar Republic, for example, be regarded as such a government? This, certainly, involves the exercise of a kind of "external" political influence which we ourselves have denounced in principle.

These new Directives assume the maintenance of a paternalistic military rule in Germany, regardless of what . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.