Canada and the United Nations

Canada and the United Nations

Canada and the United Nations

Canada and the United Nations

Excerpt

This volume forms part of a series of studies on international organization initiated by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and carried out by private institutions and individuals in more than twenty countries around the world. This particular study has been prepared under the auspices of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs by Professor F. H. Soward and Mr. Edgar McInnis, with the assistance of Mr. Walter O'Hearn.

The decision, taken in 1952, to initiate this program reflected both the Endowment's long-standing conviction that international organizations, such as the United Nations, are central to the quest for peace and the assumption that their significance and functioning depend first and foremost upon the attitudes and policies of nations. The fact that the question of Charter review would be on the agenda of the General Assembly in 1955 seemed to afford a unique opportunity for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the United Nations in terms of national expectations and their fulfilment during the brief but rich testing period of the first ten years. In sponsoring this series of studies the Endowment has sought to encourage an exchange of unofficial national views, with the object of stimulating a closer examination of the past record and future potentialities of the United Nations and of increasing understanding of differences and similarities in national attitudes toward the Organization.

In the pursuit of these objectives, the participants in each country were asked to appraise their national experience in international organizations, especially in the United Nations. In doing so they have considered such questions as: What impact has the United Nations . . .

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