Strategy

Strategy

Strategy

Strategy

Excerpt

The hydrogen bomb is not the answer to the Western peoples' dream of full and final insurance of their security. It is not a "cure-all" for the dangers that beset them. While it has increased their striking power it has sharpened their anxiety and deepened their sense of insecurity.

The atomic bomb in 1945 looked to the responsible statesmen of the West an easy and simple way of assuring a swift and complete victory--and subsequent world peace. Their thought, Sir Winston Churchill says, was that "to bring the war to an end, to give peace to the world, to lay healing hands upon its tortured peoples by a manifestation of overwhelming power at the cost of a few explosions, seemed after all our toils and perils, a miracle of deliverance." But the anxious state of the peoples of the free world today is a manifestation that the directing minds failed to think through the problem-- of attaining peace through such a victory

They did not look beyond the immediate strategic aim of "winning the war," and were content to assume that military victory would assure peace--an assumption contrary to the general experience of history. The outcome has been the latest of many lessons that pure military strategy needs to be guided by the longer and wider view from the higher plane of "grand strategy."

In the circumstances of World War II, the pursuit of triumph was foredoomed to turn into tragedy, and futility. A complete overthrow of Germany's power of resistance was bound to clear the way for Soviet Russia's domination of the Eurasian continent, and for a vast extension of Communist power in all . . .

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