Dewey, an American of This Century

Dewey, an American of This Century

Dewey, an American of This Century

Dewey, an American of This Century

Excerpt

THOMAS EDMUND DEWEY has pursued a straight path. Indeed, viewing it all today, there seems to have been a certain inevitable quality about the unfolding of his career. He has stuck with remarkable steadfastness to a forthright course of conduct. He has been unimpressed alike by the portentous warnings of the powerful or the fearful squeaks of the timorous. Respectful of tradition, he has never allowed tradition to cow him. At the end he remains unbossed, his own mana man who, happily, has no apologies to make.

One evening in the spring of 1944 an elder statesman of the Republican Party, a New Yorker of great wisdom and solid dignity, who has seen the making of much history, fell to talking of the young Dewey as he was when he first entered the lists against the great criminal combinations. He recalled that Dewey seemed almost exasperatingly sure of himself. He respected authority but was curiously unawed. Judges before whom he appeared wondered about this self- possessed young man. Could he really have the stuff? The old gentleman, reminiscing of all this, went on: "He was the perfect example of the right man at the right time. The times called for Dewey. I soon came to understand one thing, and to marvel at it: he feared the face of no man."

Throughout his career there has never been any question of the fundamental honesty and the natural courage of Mr. Dewey. He never asked the odds. He was a disciple of the pugilistic philosophy of the late Robert Fitzsimmons, who . . .

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