Earl David of Huntingdon, 1152-1219: A Study in Anglo-Scottish History

Earl David of Huntingdon, 1152-1219: A Study in Anglo-Scottish History

Earl David of Huntingdon, 1152-1219: A Study in Anglo-Scottish History

Earl David of Huntingdon, 1152-1219: A Study in Anglo-Scottish History

Excerpt

This book could not have been written without the support of the Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, who by electing me successively Bridges Research Scholar and a Research Fellow of the College provided the opportunities to venture upon advanced study. Much of the preparatory work on this and other projects was completed during my tenure of these positions. I am also deeply obliged to the College for the warm and generous hospitality with which it has welcomed me back on research visits to Cambridge after my move to Lancaster. Floreat antiqua domus!

This study endeavours to bring closer together the historians of England and Scotland in the central Middle Ages. It is therefore fitting that I should also be able to express my sincerest thanks to three scholars and friends who have, in their different ways, contributed greatly to breaking down the barriers created by the traditions of national historiography. The late Professor John Le Patourel encouraged my investigations into the Anglo-Scottish nobility, and they have benefited considerably from the framework provided by his own penetrating insights into the history of the Anglo-Norman baronage. It is naturally a cause of regret to me that he did not live to see the book published. To Professor C.R. Cheney, who solicitously guided my first researches at Cambridge, I am heavily indebted for much constructive criticism and the kindly concern he has continued to show for all my work. I am also especially grateful for the help I have received in manifold ways from Professor G. W. S. Barrow, who has been a constant source of assistance and inspiration since my undergraduate days at Newcastle upon Tyne. It was he who originally suggested that Earl David was a subject worthy of study; he maintained a lively interest in the progress of my researches; and he played a crucial part in the negotiations for the publication of the longer than average book that results. Moreover, a great deal of what I have learned about Scottish history has stemmed from discussions with him and from his own writings and Although he will not agree with all the interpretations it contains, in important aspects this book is as much his as mine. Special words of thanks are also due to Dr G. G. Simpson, who with tireless patience introduced me to the medieval archives of the Scottish Record Office, where he was formerly an Assistant Keeper, and whose thesis on Earl Roger de Quincy represents an indispensable point of departure for all students of the Anglo-Scottish baronage. Two friends and colleagues at Lancaster, Dr P. D. King and Dr A. Grant, gave . . .

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