Anglo-Saxony and Its Tradition

Anglo-Saxony and Its Tradition

Anglo-Saxony and Its Tradition

Anglo-Saxony and Its Tradition

Excerpt

For some time it has been my conviction that, if we are to stand firm in the days that are coming, we must consider well the rock whence we are hewn and the root whence we are sprung.

The substance of the following work on that theme was delivered in the form of lectures in Washington, D.C., during March 1939, by the hospitable invitation of the Bureau of Economics of the Department of Agriculture, conjointly with the Graduate School of the American University. Needless to say these hosts, who made my stay so pleasant, are in no wise responsible for the opinions here expressed. I would nevertheless wish to put on record my gratitude to them; to the general audience that patiently listened to my remarks; and, not least, to the graduate students who cross-questioned me, to my profit, about those views. They will recognize the chapters addressed especially to them.

It was further of interest, as it was a pleasure, to me to find some sympathy for the views of more topical relevancy--here stated in the 'Open Letter' which, by his benevolent permission, I have inflicted on Mr. Wells--in areas so far apart as the shores of the Great Lakes and the Deep South, and to listeners as diverse as the academic audience and the business men's lunch club.

Mr. Wells, I believe, and the common reader, I hope, will pursue with me, beyond the momentary applications, into those chapters where I have discussed those issues as cardinal to the Anglo-Saxon Tradition as his philosophy was to Marx. If some are tempted to complain that my applications are too . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.