Welsh and Scottish Nationalism: A Study

Welsh and Scottish Nationalism: A Study

Welsh and Scottish Nationalism: A Study

Welsh and Scottish Nationalism: A Study

Excerpt

The trends of race-migration in the dawn of European history determined that the inhabitants of the British Isles should be of more than one stock and culture, so that in course of time four different nations grew up within their narrow bounds, the English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish. Three of them, though not, unfortunately, the fourth, have long learned to live happily together; and, though this process was facilitated by the fact that their national homes lay side by side within one small island, nevertheless the unity of modern Britain represents a great political and psychological achievement. Britain was once a Balkans. The age-long strife between the stronger nation and its weaker neighbours was a constant factor in British history-wars of conquest and wars of liberation, rebellions and repressions, a stubborn tradition of border-fighting, and from generation to generation a legacy of hate as bitter as any that vexed the peace of continental Europe. Yet to-day those warring nations have been harmoniously combined, two of them for over 400 years, all three for nearly 150, in one close-knit multi-national state.

This achievement is the more remarkable in view of the inequality in size and strength of the three partner nations. Scotland is roughly three-fifths the size of England: its population to-day one-seventh of the English. Wales is roughly oneseventh the size of England, its population to-day one-sixteenth.

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