War and Peace in Soviet Diplomacy

War and Peace in Soviet Diplomacy

War and Peace in Soviet Diplomacy

War and Peace in Soviet Diplomacy

Excerpt

More than twenty years have passed since Russia became the political laboratory of Marxian experimentalists. Shelves of books have been written, and innumerable lives lost in an attempt to unveil the true workings and the actual results of the effort made by the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics to reconstruct human society according to the pattern designed by Marx, approved by Lenin, and followed by Stalin. Yet the enigma of the Red Kremlin still remains. The compatibility of the autocratic rule of a dictatorial régime with the democratic freedom allegedly prevailing in the Soviet Union, is still unexplained. In the field of revolutionary aspirations the raystery is even deeper, witness the continued coexistence of emphasis upon proletarian cosmopolitanism and stress upon Russian patriotism. The culminating evidence of this enigma, however, is to be found in the international relations of the U.S.S.R. Traditionally a champion of international peace, on August 23, 1939, the Soviet Union signed a Pact of Non-Aggression with the Third Reich and thereby became virtually a god-parent of the war now raging in Europe.

In the present study an attempt is made to explain the paradox of this Soviet-Nazi rapprochement. The Marxian dogmas on war and peace are analyzed, and the international relations of the Soviets are examined to determine the Marxian conceptions of war and peace and to indicate their reflections in the Soviet policy of peace.

Analytical rather than historical, the present study does not purport to censor in one way or another the Soviet records of yesterday, to appraise the Kremlin's outlook of today, or to forecast the international position of the U.S.S.R. for tomorrow. It is designed merely as an exposé of the fundamental principles of Marxism concerning the issues which have determined Soviet peace policies in the past, control the Kremlin's stand at the present, and will underlie the international relations of the U.S.S.R. in the future.

Being a study pertaining to the U.S.S.R., it is based primarily upon Russian materials. These may be broadly divided into those which furnish the theoretic background for Soviet conceptions of war . . .

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