The Control and Censorship of Caroline Drama: The Records of Sir Henry Herbert, Master of the Revels, 1623-73

The Control and Censorship of Caroline Drama: The Records of Sir Henry Herbert, Master of the Revels, 1623-73

The Control and Censorship of Caroline Drama: The Records of Sir Henry Herbert, Master of the Revels, 1623-73

The Control and Censorship of Caroline Drama: The Records of Sir Henry Herbert, Master of the Revels, 1623-73

Synopsis

As Master of the Revels, Sir Henry Herbert was responsible for licensing and censoring plays from 1623 to 1642 and again from 1660 to 1673. This completely new edition of his records includes many documents previously unavailable. A comprehensive introduction offers a new biography of Sir Henry, an account of the strange and complicated history of his private papers, and the fullest description available of his activities as Master of the Revels. The edition will be an essential reference work for literary scholars and theater historians.

Excerpt

The strange history of Sir Henry Herbert's private collection of revels papers--its sudden emergence in 1789, its virtual disappearance thirty years later, and the use of it made by scholars of the time--is set out in full in the introduction. the first attempt to bring together the surviving materials, J. Q. Adams The Dramatic Records of Sir Henry Herbert, appeared in 1917. This was a pioneering work, but it had various deficiencies. Adamsfailed to include four items from the office-book which Malone had published; his versions of the documents which now form bl ms Additional 19256 were taken from not entirely reliable transcripts by Malone and Halliwell-Phillipps, not from originals; and he did not even mention material available to him, such as the provincial records published by J. T. Murray in 1910. Subsequently W. J. Lawrence discovered entries from the office-book that Malone had written into his own books now in the Bodleian Library but not published, and G. E. Bentley printed more play- licences from Ord transcripts inserted into the notebooks of Halliwell- Phillipps in the Folger Shakespeare Library.

All this material is included here, together with fresh discoveries, the most important of which is the Burn transcript in Yale University Library. This has yielded forty-nine completely new entries from the office-book, including the titles of over thirty plays hitherto unknown. An examination of notebooks compiled by Chalmers and Halliwell- Phillipps and of Malone's books and papers in the Bodleian has brought to light another twenty-six new entries. As a result, this edition contains seventy-nine entries from the office-book not found in Adams or Bentley, and for a further twenty-seven it provides a more detailed or accurate text than has hitherto been available. This enlarges the number of surviving entries from the office-book by approximately a quarter.

Paradoxically, one effect of these new discoveries has been to make it even clearer than before that we possess only a selection, possibly a small fraction, of what was in the office-book, particularly for the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.