Soviet Agricultural and Peasant Affairs

Soviet Agricultural and Peasant Affairs

Soviet Agricultural and Peasant Affairs

Soviet Agricultural and Peasant Affairs

Excerpt

The student of soviet affairs is acutely aware that the Russian Revolution of 1917 was a peasant revolution. Since, however, the peasant was without adequate political organization and leadership, a relatively small handful of highly disciplined men, Communists who called themselves Bolsheviki, were able to capture the leadership in the cities and eventually seize control for their ends. The student of Soviet affairs is also impressed by the knowledge that agricultural and peasant problems have remained, from the beginning, the primary domestic problem area for the Soviet leadership. Nearly one-half of the Soviet population is still classified as rural, and agricultural production remains highly unsatisfactory. Yet agriculture is still one of the most neglected areas of study by Western Sovietologists.

Hundreds of studies of the Soviet Union have appeared in recent years, but only a small handful have dealt with the peasant and agriculture. At the time of this writing, although numerous collections of articles and conference papers have been published in the field of Soviet studies, no previous attempt has been made to present under a single cover the efforts of the best minds who have dealt with Soviet agriculture. Producing such a volume was one of the primary goals of the Lawrence conference.

Agriculture is far more than a matter of farming technique. It is a way of life. If one is to have the best possible opportunity to understand the nature and problems of Soviet agriculture, not only are the analyses of the agronomist required, but also those of the anthropologist, the economist, the geographer, the historian, the political scientist, and the sociologist. With this conviction in mind, we offer this volume, feeling that here for the first time, in a single book, are not only views of the majority of the living scholars who have contributed most to the Western understanding of rural Russia, but also the findings of several younger men whose work is receiving increasingly high regard in the field.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.