The Official Papers of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stiffkey, Norfolk, as Justice of the Peace, 1580-1620

The Official Papers of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stiffkey, Norfolk, as Justice of the Peace, 1580-1620

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The Official Papers of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stiffkey, Norfolk, as Justice of the Peace, 1580-1620

The Official Papers of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stiffkey, Norfolk, as Justice of the Peace, 1580-1620

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The following collection of documents forms part of those referred to by the Historical MSS. Commissioner as being in the possession of the agent of Lord Townshend, Mr Anstel Day. The latter had borrowed them with a view to publication and contributed two articles to the Norfolk Arhcæological Transactions.1Regarding the Commissioners' report that "great progress was made with the arrangement and transcription of the documents."2The present Editor found about one quarter copied, very imperfectly, of which rather more than twenty were in Mr Day's writing. Probably some of his work has been lost, as on the back of one of the copies is pencilled "see draft article." Mr Day died in 1886 and the documents were passed on to Dr Jessop3 who, either through lack of time or inclination, did nothing with them and had, probably, only a vague idea of their contents. They were had, to the present Editor by Dr Jessop at the end of 1911.

The collection consists of the official and private correspondence of Sir Nathaniel Bacon and of duplicate of his own letters copied, for the most part, in his own handwriting. The private letters are few and the value of this volume lies chiefly in illustrating the system and operation of local government during this period.

These papers have come into the Townshend collection through the marriage of Sir John Townshend with Anna, eldest daughter and co-heiress of Sir Nathaniel Bacon. Nathaniel Bacon was born in 1547, the second son of Sir Nicholas Bacon by his first wife, Jane, daughter of William Fernley of West Creting. He was admitted to Gray's Inn, December 15, 1562, and became an "ancient of the society" in November, 1576. He was then an active Justice of the Peace in Norfolk and in this year acted as one of the Commissioners for the restraint of the exportation of corn. The letters of his brother-in-law, Francis Wyndham, elected in the same year Recorder of the City of Norwich, show that Bacon was already keenly associating himself with most of the local interests, and in 1577 he was further engaged in the control of the exportation of wool and leather. He sat with Sir Drew Drury as Member of Parliament for Norfolk in 1584 and the discovery of the Throgmorton plot with . . .

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