The Immigrant Labor Press in North America, 1840s-1970s: An Annotated Bibliography - Vol. 1

The Immigrant Labor Press in North America, 1840s-1970s: An Annotated Bibliography - Vol. 1

The Immigrant Labor Press in North America, 1840s-1970s: An Annotated Bibliography - Vol. 1

The Immigrant Labor Press in North America, 1840s-1970s: An Annotated Bibliography - Vol. 1

Synopsis

Preface Labor Migrants and Their Press An Internationally Mobile Working Class and Its Press in North America: A Survey by Dirk Hoerder Bibliography User's Guide Migrants for Northern Europe The Press of Labor Migrants from the Nordic Countries: Introduction by Dirk Hoerder List of Depositories Scandinavians by Michael Brook, Jens Bjerre Danielson, and Robert J. Mikkelsen Danes by Jens Bjerre Danielson Swedes by Michael Brook Norwegians by Robert L. Mikkelsen Finns by Auvo Kostiainen Icelanders by Keneva Kunz Combined Title Index

Excerpt

The idea of compiling this bibliography was born when it became obvious that the detailed studies of the role of individual ethnic groups in the North American working classes already available needed to be supplemented by a broad comparative approach taking into account the cultures of origin, migration processes and specific forms of acculturation in the United States or Canada. The periodicals of the working-class sections of the many ethnic groups are a basic source of material for such comparative studies. About thirty scholars cooperated in the preparation of this work. They came from many cultures and this of course meant that their scholarly traditions, styles of annotation, their questions and experiences varied widely. In addition national and international rules of cataloguing differ and have repeatedly been changed in recent years. The editors have done their best to provide a uniform format for all bibliographic entries, but in many cases this was impossible. For each language section the respective cooperating language specialist was responsible for the draft manuscript and the selection of titles, though often he/she had to draw on the expertise of many other colleagues. The editors have made suggestions for changes and in some cases added or deleted information and periodical titles according to the general framework. This general framework was laid down in a detailed manual of style, which included more rules than some ethnic groups published periodicals. But more than thirty language groups --not to mention the smaller ones on which we sought information, only to find that they did not have a labor press in North America-- meant many more different cultures and footnote styles. They could not be compartmentalized into one grand scheme and so we can only apologize for the inadequacies of what we have produced.

Once upon a time many of the great labor historians of our age got together not in an ivory tower but in an ivy league school to exchange views and spread the light of learning. To make sure that in their scholarly eagerness they would not bypass history as it was perceived by those living through it, they invited a few old and venerable labor militants to come and listen to them. When the most outspoken of the scholarly fraternity had explained his research in vivid detail, a superannuated Wobbly turned to the scholar sitting next to him and grumbled: "Anemia from academia!" We hope that those, who feel that the essays, annotated entries, appendices and everything else that makes up this bibliography do not capture the thrill and despair of the labor struggles and routines, the pride as well as the drudgery of work, the expectations and the anxieties of labor migrants, will use these newspapers and experience the same exitement as we have while preparing this bibliography. To us they have been a constant source of inspiration.

D.H., C.H.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.