Sales Force Dynamics: Motives, Management, Money, Marketplace

Sales Force Dynamics: Motives, Management, Money, Marketplace

Sales Force Dynamics: Motives, Management, Money, Marketplace

Sales Force Dynamics: Motives, Management, Money, Marketplace

Synopsis

Understanding the dynamics of a sales force--defined as the interaction of motives, management, money, and marketplace--is at the core of developing a successful sales team. Weitzul evaluates these four factors separately and analyzes their interaction. Having identified the types of people that are successful in sales, the discussion expands to include their appropriate management and leadership. Since money is considered to be so important to sales personnel, its prime motivational role is identified and reviewed for a variety of sales people with different motives. Finally, the importance of the marketplace as the ultimate source of feedback on the sales personnel, sales management, and product is reviewed and critiqued.

Excerpt

The ability to select solid sales personnel requires an understanding of human behavior. We are each different, with unique habits and traits, but at the same time we all possess characteristics that can be measured. An individual's educational attainment, work history, and personal background can be reviewed and quantified. Less exact but equally important evaluations can be made of factors like social dominance, money motivation, and need for achievement. By measuring and combining these separate pieces of information about a person, one can form a mental picture of that person and determine his or her capacity for success in a sales position.

Some straightforward criteria do exist for measuring a person's potential for success in sales. In sales the best predictor of future performance is typically the person's record of accomplishment and current level of ability. The record of accomplishment is generally evaluated by reviewing a person's education, life history, and professional accomplishments--as they relate to the job. This frequently means reviewing and analyzing the person's performance in educational programs (high school or college) and/or previous years of experience at the professional level. In the course of this review, strengths, weaknesses and developmental issues are noted. When all is said and done, the person is rated (according to some formula) as possessing high, medium, or low potential. This rating represents one-half of the evaluation process. The next step is to measure the candidate's current level of ability. This may require that they complete a . . .

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