The Oxford University Press, New York, 1896-1946

The Oxford University Press, New York, 1896-1946

The Oxford University Press, New York, 1896-1946

The Oxford University Press, New York, 1896-1946

Excerpt

On THE 26th of September in the year 1896, there appeared in the Publisher's Weekly, New York City, a four- page advertisement which informed its readers that the American Branch of the Oxford University Press had ready for sale 'an entirely new and improved line of Genuine Oxford Bibles at popular prices throughout, and with many new and useful features added.' Assertion that these Bibles constituted the 'best line ever produced' was buttressed by descriptions of their text, their paper, and their bindings; and the name of Henry Frowde, appearing at the bottom of the first page, shed a small private luster to supplement the greater luster shed by the name of the ancient Press he served.

Oxford Bibles were no new thing to American bookstores and book buyers. Their reputation stemmed from a time when the population of all New England numbered only some fifty-five thousand souls, for it was in the year 1675 that the first Bible issued from the Oxford Press, then housed in the Sheldonian Theatre, and from that day forward the business of publishing Bibles at Oxford had steadily grown, flourishing during the eighteenth century, and waxing still more during the nineteenth, when the introduction of India Paper opened new vistas to the craft of manufacturing, and the publication of the Revised New Testament, in conjunction with Cambridge, was an event of international importance. . . .

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