The Emerging Religion of Science

The Emerging Religion of Science

The Emerging Religion of Science

The Emerging Religion of Science

Synopsis

The Emerging Religion of Science is a broad and erudite examination of the individual's place in the modern world. What can we believe today that will not betray us tomorrow, the author asks. Religion is losing influence but the scientist, who explores the laws of nature, may be the modern guide to meaning. The mathematical equations of science have become unifying elements of the world as we know it. The author explores ways to face today's problems within the context of good and evil, freedom and restraint, probability and certainty, the real and the illusory, and the concept of self.

Excerpt

The perennial battle between religion and science is surfacing today as "the Bible vs. Evolution," "Creationism vs. Darwinism," or some similar set of alternatives. At the same time, what are called the laws of Nature, expressed as they are in the mathematical equations of science, have become the unifying elements of the world as we know it, the threads that tie things together.

But mathematics, as Whitehead and Russell have pointed out, is symbolic logic. Hence the world as a whole, however unreasonable it may sometimes appear to be, may be seen as an expression, or even an embodiment, of logic, Reason with a capital R.

In such a world, the scientist, who explores the laws of nature and their implications, is the true seer (see-er), or, as we might say, the Prophet of the Wholeness of Things.

Goodness lies in finding and revealing the meaning of these laws in social as well as individual relationships. and the truly religious person is the one who sees, and feels deeply, the hold that the laws must have over everything, from the field of the microscope to the affairs of everyday life, and from the stars in their courses to the politics of nations.

History is not simply a record of what has happened, but the working out of these laws in the actual world, where the apparent element of chance reflects only our own ignorance. For, as Einstein has put it, "the Lord doesn't throw dice. . . ."

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