Spring Flora of Missouri

Spring Flora of Missouri

Spring Flora of Missouri

Spring Flora of Missouri

Excerpt

This book is intended for use of everyone interested in plants, particularly the beginner. Its purpose is to acquaint the people of Missoori and surrounding states with the native flowers, which are in bloom on or before June 1.

The arbitrary selection of June 1 was made for several reasons: first, around this time of the year most of the schools are closing for vacation; and, second, most of the typical spring wild flowers have passed the climax of their blooming season by this date, while the summer flowers are becoming more conspicuous. Of course, a number of species recorded in this book will not be flowering in all parts of the state at the same time, and some which are found in bloom on May 31 in extreme southern Missouri may not be actually in flower in northern Missouri until middle or late June. All species are therefore included which, by actual record and observation, are known to bloom in some part of the state before June 1. Any omissions are due not to an oversight, but to a conservative recording only of those which are actually blooming during this period.

An attempt has been made to express the descriptive matter of this book in easily understood language, and, as far as possible, to avoid the use of technical botanical terms. It is wholly unnecessary to have to resort to unfamiliar language in order to be scientific. Of course, technical terms do away with much wordiness. On the other hand, botanists and zoologists have often carried this practice to such an extreme that people, bent on learning plants because of their real interest in them, must resort to almanacs, encyclopedias, or colored-picture books. In recent years, however, this lack of consideration has been more and more deplored by botanists themselves.

The characters used in the keys for separating the groups of plants are based, as far as possible, upon obvious and easily observed features, such as color and arrangement of flower; size, color, and arrangement of leaves; habit, environment, and range of the plant, etc. Botanists have in the past come to depend entirely too much on the detailed structure of the parts of the flower for separating species, genera, and families. Thus, they have given great importance to the superior of inferior ovary, number of cells in the ovary, position of the ovules, and the like. As is demonstrated throughout this book, plants can be keyed out and named accurately by using the characters of the leaves, stem, and root. In some especially difficult and technical groups (for instance, Rosa . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.