Buganda and British Overrule, 1900-1955: Two Studies

Buganda and British Overrule, 1900-1955: Two Studies

Buganda and British Overrule, 1900-1955: Two Studies

Buganda and British Overrule, 1900-1955: Two Studies

Excerpt

We are both very conscious that we are trespassers in this series. Neither of us has been directly involved in the Leadership Scheme. However, it has been our great good fortune whilst respectively lecturing in History and in Political Science at Makerere College, the University College of East Africa, to have been closely associated in discussion and in friendship with those who have been participating in the Buganda half of the scheme.

The two parts of this present volume are distinct. The first began as an expanded section of a larger study of the relations between the British and what was to become the modern Uganda, between 1862 and 1902. The second began as an adjunct to an investigation of the political aspects of British colonial policy based on a more detailed case study of Buganda's neighbouring district Busoga. The first is an intensive study of the Uganda Agreement of 1900 in its origins and its original implementation. It is hoped that the importance of the Agreement justifies the detail in which it has been examined. The second is an extensive study of that Agreement in practice and an attempt to compare the Buganda experience with the recommendations and expectations of the indirect rule school of African administration. It seemed, however, that our studies were, despite their diversities of origin and approach, closely related to one another. They both deal with the constitutional and political relationships between Buganda and British colonial authority. We are most grateful to the Director of the Leadership Scheme, Professor Fallers, for arranging their publication together in this series and for giving so freely of his time to our manuscripts.

The second study in this volume ends with an account of the crisis in Protectorate-Buganda relations which suddenly brought Buganda into the news columns of British newspapers. The introductory paragraph to that account stresses its tentative nature. It is exceedingly difficult and perhaps foolhardy to attempt a reassessment at this stage of the events that led to the deportation of Kabaka Mutesa II and to his subsequent return.

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