The Business of Being Buffalo Bill: Selected Letters of William F. Cody, 1879-1917

The Business of Being Buffalo Bill: Selected Letters of William F. Cody, 1879-1917

The Business of Being Buffalo Bill: Selected Letters of William F. Cody, 1879-1917

The Business of Being Buffalo Bill: Selected Letters of William F. Cody, 1879-1917

Synopsis

Letters Major Sam Hall General Nelson A. Miles Captain Charles Penney O'Dwyer Frank Hammet Joseph W. Cook Mike K. Russell C.L. Hinkle Deforrest Richards W.A. Richards R. Farrington Elwell James A. Bailey Joseph T. McCaddon Granddaughter Jane L.W. Getchell J. Frank Cody Noble Getchell Stacey Clarence Buell Jacob Schwoob Western Union E.E. Arbuckle Henry Hersey William Cody Boal Telegrams Relating to Cody's Final Illness and Death Letter of Sympathy from the Oglala Sioux to the Cody Family Resolution in Memoriam From the California Legislature Appendix A: Information on the Compo Bonito Mine Appendix B: Letters to Cody and Letters Dealing with Cody's Affairs Appendix C: Legal Documents Appendix D: Miscellaneous Information

Excerpt

If ever a man was defined by his work it was William F. Cody. Even his well-known nickname "Buffalo Bill" was earned on the job. Known as a scout, a pony express rider, an actor, and a showman, he has been called an American hero and an American heel. The subject of hundreds of novels, movies, paintings, historical studies and documentaries, Cody has become larger than life for many people, one of those figures each of us has formed an image of--an image based on some strange mixture of fact and fiction--an image that is different for each individual--and an image that seems somehow incomplete in every case.

Though much has been said, written and conjectured about this man there is still more to be discovered. What was he like in his private moments? Who was the man behind the jobs, the titles, the costume? What would he say about himself if he could tell his story free of the public spotlight and the need to earn his living?

Cody is long gone and can no longer answer our questions and explain the strange inconsistencies in the stories we have of his life. His autobiographies are no help as they were part of his effort to sell himself to the public and at least some portion of them were ghost-written anyway. The accounts of his life written by those closest to him, his sisters and John Burke (his press agent), are even less help as they are flagrant . . .

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