Mid-Life Issues and the Workplace of the 90s: A Guide for Human Resource Specialists

Mid-Life Issues and the Workplace of the 90s: A Guide for Human Resource Specialists

Mid-Life Issues and the Workplace of the 90s: A Guide for Human Resource Specialists

Mid-Life Issues and the Workplace of the 90s: A Guide for Human Resource Specialists

Synopsis

The median age of workers in the U.S. will reach 36 by the year 2000. The number of workers between the ages of 35 and 47 will increase by 38%, while those aged 48 to 53 will grow by a staggering 67%. As a result, human resources managers will have to deal increasingly with the unique employee issues and personal mid-life stresses which affect work performance. Waskel discusses this "middle-aging" of the work force, and its impact on workplace productivity. Not only does Waskel's book explain the symptomology of mid-life and its effects, but also suggests programs and counseling groups, to which employees can be referred.

Excerpt

The maturing workplace is now a reality. In fact, mid-life employees are becoming the subject of articles and books. There is a projected worker shortage for the end of the 1990s. We see advertisements begging older workers to reenter the work force and help serve others by taking a position at Burger King or McDonald's.

The U.S. Department of Labor issued its agenda, "Workforce Quality: A Challenge for the 1990s, Secretary Dole's Agenda for Action," to address the labor shortage, its causes and possible solutions. The society has made a shift toward a service-producing economy. There is more evidence that the work force is ill-equipped to meet the challenges of a global economy.

Since I began writing this book, there has been an increased number of articles that address these issues. The major emphasis has been on the lack of worker skills and the slow response rate of organizations, which hesitate to provide the necessary training. There is also the lack of concern on the part of companies for their employees' needs and desires. As buyouts, mergers, closings, and obsolete skills continue within the work force, more mid- life workers are either forced or choose to leave. Rapid change and the scramble to become competitive within a global market economy require well-trained, skilled, intelligent, and experienced workers. Paradoxically, these are the very workers who are encouraged to leave the work force. Organizations do not capitalize on the positive aspects of mid-life workers. Instead they use attractive packages to propel these workers from a productive work life into early retirement. It is also not uncommon for mid- life workers to find their jobs boring or dissatisfying. This comes at a time when mid-life workers are reaching their peak potential. Those who have continued to learn and grow both personally and on the job are eager for . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.