Communism in Korea - Vol. 1

Communism in Korea - Vol. 1

Communism in Korea - Vol. 1

Communism in Korea - Vol. 1

Excerpt

In this work, we seek to combine two basic approaches. The first eight chapters represent a historical, developmental, analytical treatment. Drawing upon the widest range of sources available to us, we have sought to provide hypotheses and interpretations relating to the origins and evolution of the Korean Communist movement. In this manner, we hope to shed light upon such questions as the wellsprings of Korean Communism and its relation to other Asian Communist movements at various points in its development; the socioeconomic character of early Communist leadership, and the subsequent changes that took place; the capacities of a police-state, Japanese style, to handle extreme dissidence; the additional problems bequeathed to an underground movement, and one largely in exile; the role of Soviet leaders and the Comintern in the movement; and the basic causes for failure before 1945.

It is in this part also that we explore the manner in which factionalism was met after 1945; the rise of Kim Il-song to a position of absolute power; the evolution of economic policies -- both industrial and agricultural; the emergence of chuch'e as a dominant theme; and the extraordinarily important, complex, and changing relations with the Soviet Union and China.

In the second and final seven chapters, we turn to topical social science-oriented analysis, seeking to probe the key facets of the North Korean system and its basic style of operation. It is in this part that we attempt to deal with the evolving character of the political elite in its broadest dimensions; the special characteristics of Communist organization; the role of ideology at this point in time; the status and functions of special groups within the society, notably the Party cadres, the military, and the intellectuals; the essential nature of the economic structure and its performance to date; and the actual life-style of the worker and peasant in the Kim era.

This is not the place to prejudge the evidence or to produce our conclusions. It is appropriate here, however, to suggest the reasons for the particular treatment of the data outlined above. Some aspects of Korean . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.